The Hippies Who Meant It

by Seymour Hamilton

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Ebook:
118,193 words
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Audiobook:
769 min
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Synopsis

In the mid 60s, Joe from the Bronx and Beth the orphan escape New York City for Canada, hoping to leave their past lives — and American politics —behind them. At a peace march on their way north, their fortunes intertwine with the fate of Dick, a Royal Military College Officer Cadet.

Armed with naïveté, optimism and a little weed, the three homestead on Nova Scotia’s North Mountain. Unlike many of the fair-weather hippies of summer, they make it through the first winter with a little help from their hardier neighbours.

Steve, a man damaged by the Vietnam War, shatters their peaceful existence in one night of rape and violence. When he disappears, the Mountain folk hope that peace will return to their little world. Birth, marriage, death, divorce, and fresh relationships complicate their lives. But even as they gradually resolve the consequences of their own pasts, they become increasingly aware that Steve may return to destroy all they have achieved.

Story Elements

Ratings Factors

Language: Minor profanity used occasionally
Sexual Content: Occasional detailed sex scene
Target Audience Age: 18+ (Adult only, inappropriate for children)
Violence: Death, but minimal violence

Setting

Geography: Earth
Realism: Consistent with real world, no magic, no unachieved science
Setting Type: Pastoral (rural & small towns)
Time Period: 1960 - 1969

Main Character

Age: Young Adult
Gender: Female
Race: Caucasian European
Religion: Irrelevant
Sexual Preference: Heterosexual

Styles & Themes

Humor: Moments of levity
Inspires Reader to Feel: Nostalgic/Happy
Mysteries & Puzzles: Significant mystery(ies) are core to driving the story
Pacing: Time to savor, deliberate
Physical Action: Minor and occasional action
Political/Social Commentary: Heavy use of social and political themes on a personal level
Romance: Major romance, essential to story
Genre Mystery
 
Mysteries & Puzzles:
  • Significant mystery(ies) are core to driving the story
  • Thought-provoking puzzles tangentially related to story
  • Puzzles or clues that reader could use to solve mystery(ies) of story

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About the author

Seymour Hamilton

​It took a long time until I could legitimately call myself a fiction writer, although I remember wanting to do so when I was about 12 years old. I was a war baby, born in 1941 in England during an air-raid. The war raged on for four more years, none of which I remember, possibly because my mother wrapped me in fantasy by singing, reading and telling me stories she made up as she went along. When my father came back from almost six continuous years of war at sea, interrupted only briefly to do his part in bringing me into the world, he continued my education by reading me Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner. I thought it was autobiography. At that time, we lived in Mauritius, an island with sandy beaches and volcanic peaks that are the stuff of fairy tales. It was there I first learned to sail a dinghy from my father, who, like my grandfather, was a Master Mariner and Commander in the British Navy. In 1949, we came to Canada, where I have lived ever since, eventually acquiring three increasingly impractical degrees. Like many Canadians, I moved around a lot in my very large country. I grew up in Ottawa, my first job as an English teacher was on the East Coast in Nova Scotia; my next in Burnaby on the West. It was many years later while I was teaching in Calgary and hiking in the Rockies that I wrote The Laughing Princess, borrowing from Pamela Nagely Stevenson the names of a dozen dragons she had sculpted in ceramics. The harp music of Kim Robertson played as I wrote. I studied English Literature because I loved books, particularly fantasy, which was no help at all in becoming successful as an academic. My first job as at Acadia University in Nova Scotia, where just down the road on the North Mountain, young Americans and Canadians were going back to the land and learning that homesteading involved a lot more than just optimism and a little weed. After three years teaching in Nova Scotia and another three at Simon Fraser University at the other side of the country, I went back to get a PhD at Queen's University, where I had completed my BA in 1958. When I finished my doctorate in 1977, there were no jobs available in Canadian universities. Reasoning that all those years of education must have at least equipped me to research and write, I spent the next 20 years of my working life as an editor and writer-for-hire, which helped me do my share of bringing up my sons.. When I retired, my wonderful wife Katherine soldiered on, giving me the great gift of being able to write for me, instead of someone else. I live in Chelsea, Quebec, just north of Ottawa, and have done for more than 20 years -- the longest I have ever spent in one place. This is where I completed a lifetime’s ambition to write a story for boys and tomboys of all ages. The Astreya Trilogy had been on my mind since the 1970’s, increasing in volume by fits and starts. In retirement, it became a full-time activity, growing from a short novell [...]